word


Bibliography
July 6, 2011, 3:09 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

http://www.jstor.org.queens.ezproxy.cuny.edu:2048/stable/20063077?&Search=yes&searchText=narration&searchText=quixote&searchText=don&searchText=characters&list=hide&searchUri=%2Faction%2FdoBasicSearch%3FQuery%3Ddon%2Bquixote%2Bnarration%2Band%2Bcharacters%26acc%3Don%26wc%3Don%26&prevSearch=&item=1&ttl=963&returnArticleService=showFullText

-“multitude of voices”… more than one narrative voice

-narrative structure of Don Quixote stemmed from the structure of narratives in which the main character gets lost in; chivalric romances.



Omaha Bigelow:A Review
July 6, 2011, 2:50 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

If Omaha Bigelow, the novel, could speak… i think it would scream out “Don’t judge me!”. It is an insanely unique book in my opinion. The story line goes from totally realistic and somewhat intriguing to absolutely bizarre. I might have been a bit more interested in the book because it was based on life in NYC. Not only was it set in New York but the Lower East side of Manhattan; there is nothing cooler than that, friends!
Usually, stereotypes bother be but not in the sense where i become offended or feel disrespected for those who are being categorized. Though i did not get too hung up on this factor, i did take notice. Stereotyping, as was Vega (ex. green hair, played in a punk rock band and lived in the LES- come on! it doesnt get anymore LES-St. Mark’s street than that) bothers me more so because it shows a lack of creativity; a chance to think outside the box was not taken. The unlikely problems of Vega are extremely comical but of course also very vulgar. The 15 year-old girl with witch like powers is an even more unlikely solution to his problem! Truthfully, the vulgarity didnt exactly bother me. Perhaps if it were made into a motion picture i would have a hard time watching it but reading it is actually fun! I suppose it is because my mind allows me to see what i want, i dont have to stare at the directors point of view.



More about a story about a story that is about nothing…sound familiar?!
July 6, 2011, 4:34 am
Filed under: Uncategorized

Whenever i hear “a story about nothing” i think about nothing else but my good ol’ friend Jerry Seinfeld and his show that has kept me entertained since i was too young to understand what i was laughing about.
For those who arent familiar with the show Seinfeld…get familiar! No but seriously, a lot of people my age are not fans or really never gave themselves the chance to become a fan. Allow me to elaborate on the brilliant nothingness that, creator Sir Larry David (Curb Your Enthusiasm) has created. Jerry Seinfeld; main character…real life “funny man” turned sitcom superstar…he played a quasi version of himself in the show as a comedian with 3 best friends who each have an interesting and hilarious personality but all pretty much “normal” New Yorkers. Jerry’s NYC apartment and the coffee shop down the street are the key hangout spots for congregating about…well…nothing! They really play out the “normal, modern, everyday” scheme of the average human being. Of course, it is a comedy so even death is turned into something laughable. The show features instances that could basically happen to anybody at any given moment, nothing overly dramatic…sometimes the show really is about nothing because it is revolving mostly around the way the thirty-something singles go about the many events in their busy lives.
SO…in the last two episodes of Seinfeld, season 4 Jerry and George go to NBC (the actual network in which Seinfeld is provided by) and they get the opportunity to produce their own show. They come up with a brilliant idea. When asked what the show would be about, they say, with extreme confidence: “Nothing!”. This is probably a play on the viewers and the incredible ratings; clearly the show is a hit in reality and so their replica show couldnt possibly be anything less. In these episodes, the characters are promoting a show titled “Jerry”; the show within the show. They audition characters and select them to their likings… this gives them to chance to tell their story to their disposition…As Barth (1984 [1981]) puts it, there are “tales within tales within tales”. Jerry and George are building a narrative within a narrative.




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